Resources for Job Seekers

“Chance favors the prepared mind.” — Louis Pasteur
 
Company Culture

During the interview process the primary focus is on selling yourself and making the best impression. Have the hiring managers done the same in selling the company to you? It’s a two way street. One big shortcoming within the corporate community is that companies often get cavalier in their attitudes and forget they need to sell you on the opportunity they are offering. You need to evaluate IF YOU will be happy in this work environment.

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Resumes

A solid resume means two things:  Great content and a clean professional look.. Aesthetically, you want your resume to be organized and able to draw a reader in. You want your hiring manager to take note of ALL your accomplishments, past work experiences, and skills as though they are literally jumping off the page.

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References

In most cases, it is good to list about three to four references.  And be sure to list your strongest or closest references first.  These people should know you well and should be able to attest to your skills and strengths. They don’t always have to be bosses or supervisors. Rather, they can be co-workers, clients, professors, or other peers—so long as they have an intimate knowledge of your working skills.

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On-site Interviews

With increasing competition in the job market, more and more companies are using telephone interviews to pre-screen candidates. This offers employers a way to narrow the applicant pool and minimize expenses involved in interviewing out-of-town candidates. Phone interviews are a great way to sell yourself in an informal setting. With preparation, you should have the confidence it takes to impress employers.

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Cost of Living

When you find yourself taking on new employment in one of these regions, it is important to factor in how much of your new salary is going to go toward funding your living space. In fact, you will most likely need to negotiate a significant raise from what you were previously making in order to do this.

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Phone Interviews

With increasing competition in the job market, more and more companies are using telephone interviews to pre-screen candidates. This offers employers a way to narrow the applicant pool and minimize expenses involved in interviewing out-of-town candidates. Phone interviews are a great way to sell yourself in an informal setting. With preparation, you should have the confidence it takes to impress employers.

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Behavioral Interviews

Behavioral-based interviewing is interviewing based on discovering how the interviewee acted in specific employment-related situations. The logic; how you behaved in the past will predict how you will behave in the future, i.e. past performance predicts future performance.

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Resignation Letters

Resignation letters are important  as they not only put an official end to your tenure at a company but also show that you are a professional in every way.  You need to keep in mind that it’s just part of your “career package” and something that shouldn’t be overlooked.

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Salary Comparisons

Calculating the bump you will need (or want) for your next position is a bit tricky.  The first place to start is taking a hard look at cost of living changes from where you are now to where you plan on going.

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Thank You Notes

A thank-you note should be sent within 24 hours after any interview. It shows the potential employer that you are a serious candidate with excellent follow-up skills.

An effective thank-you letter is a brief, well-written reminder that you are the best candidate for the position. Thank-you notes should be thought of as “influence letters,” which unlike a basic thank-you note, should do a lot more to influence the interviewer. It should remind the interviewer about your strengths, and also answer any potential objections.

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